Solar Bankers, SkyLedger Target Near East Energy Markets With Blockchain and ICO


Article on BlockTribune

Blockchain, FinTech, ICO, Investing, News, Uncategorized | September 29, 2017By:

Solar Bankers has announced plans for a decentralized electricity network, allowing consumers to freely produce and trade clean energy using proprietary energy-generating devices. It plans to fund development with an initial coin offering (ICO) for SunCoin, a token available to the public in November.

The Solar Bankers networks will be based on SkyLedger, a blockchain platform which implements a new distributed consensus algorithm called Obelisk, which distributes influence over the network according to a “web of trust” which corrects security flaws and centralizing tendencies associated with many blockchain networks. SkyLedger transactions happen in seconds and can be adapted to any transaction rate. The network does not require fees, instead using a mechanism in which users receive coin-hours for holding their tokens which can be spent to confirm transactions. The SkyLedger platform is energy sustainable and saves electricity costs.

Carlo Maragliano, Chief Technology Officer at Solar Bankers LLC, answered some Block Tribune questions about the company.

BLOCK TRIBUNE: What markets are you targeting?

CARLO MARAGLIANO:  East Asia, Middle East & North Africa (MENA) and Central America.<p.

BLOCK TRIBUNE:  Do you have any differences with other companies trying the same thing?

CARLO MARAGLIANO:  Two main differences: Solar Bankers is not a startup but is a solid and mature company, which is backed by a set of strong soft assets – in the form of a game-changing international patent – and a host of ongoing partnerships and projects, cutting-edge product development, and market expertise. In the future, the value of the company will also be backed by hard assets – in the form of manufacturing facilities.

SunCoin,as a cryptocurrency in its own right,represents a far more efficient and secure alternative to existing digital currencies (BTC or ETH) because it is based on a new generation of blockchain technology, (SkyLedger) that involves a revolutionary consensus algorithm (Obelisk), ultra-fast transactions with no fees, and a multi-layered security structure.

BLOCK TRIBUNE:  What happens if the utilities go off-line for whatever reason (storm, natural disaster, etc.). Are you equally out of business?

CARLO MARAGLIANO:  No, because we rely exclusively on renewable energy, which can be produced in a decentralized way and reduces the risk of total blackout.

BLOCK TRIBUNE:  What is the penetration of renewable energy in your markets?

CARLO MARAGLIANO:  East Asia is the leading region for manufacturing of solar panels. China is the world’s largest investor in clean energy and has been installing record amounts of solar this year after adding 24 GW of capacity only in the first half.The renewable energy sector has made  amazing progress in the last five years across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Some of the world’s largest and most innovative projects are developed and installed here (i.e. 1GW Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum solar park in Dubai, UAE).

Central America has recently invested heavily into renewable resources. Costa Rica, for example, ran on 100 percent renewable energy for 76 straight days between June and August this year, demonstrating that life without fossil fuels is possible.

BLOCK TRIBUNE:  Will there be a cost to get the device?

CARLO MARAGLIANO:  Yes, Solar Bankers’ energy generating devices can be bought at a discounted price with SunCoins. Prices are available in our white paper.

BLOCK TRIBUNE:   What are the ICO details?

CARLO MARAGLIANO:  Pre-ICO is currently running, end date: Oct. 15

PRICE: 1 SUN = 0.0000504 BTC – Cap: 18,000,000 SUN

Solar Bankers’ network and token are based on SkyLedger

ICO

Starting date: November (date not yet decided)

Four different prices with fixed caps

I PRICE: 1 SUN = 21,600 Satoshi – Cap 24,250,000 SUN

II PRICE: 1 SUN = 25,925 Satoshi – Cap 24,250,000 SUN

III PRICE: 1 SUN = 31,112 Satoshi – Cap 24,250,000 SUN

IV PRICE: 1 SUN = 36,000 Satoshi – Cap 24,250,000 SUN

Advertisements

Solar Bankers’ Initial Coin Offering


The solar energy company Solar Bankers Singapore is launching an Initial Coin Offering (ICO) to raise funds for the development of a revolutionary system of localized energy communities in which consumers can freely produce and trade electricity. Solar Bankers Singapore is known for having developed and patented a series of innovative photovoltaic solutions, including a hologram-based film that filters and concentrates incoming sunlight to make solar panels more efficient and less expensive.

Solar Bankers is now working with the Chinese blockchain technology company ShellPay to promote the wholesale decentralization of all infrastructures for electricity production, transmission, and exchange. The partnership is planning to make the generation and distribution of energy greener and more efficient by supplying households with Solar Bankers’ cutting-edge PV devices and connecting them in a system of local micro-grids. Solar Bankers envisions that this decentralized system, which it calls “SunChain”, will allow consumers to both produce their own green electricity and sell any excess at competitive prices to their neighbors in local marketplaces. While owners of devices will benefit from an additional source of income, reduced transportation costs will allow passive consumers to benefit from more affordable electricity. In addition, transactions will be managed by a system of smart contracts based on an improved blockchain platform developed by ShellPay, making large bureaucratic intermediaries obsolete.

Solar Bankers’ current ICO project seeks to finance initial grid developments in China. The company has now launched a major marketing campaign for the pre-ICO phase of its fundraiser, during which it is offering 18 million of its “SunCoin” at the price of $0.14. For the actual ICO later this year, the company is successively selling four tranches of around 24 million tokens at increasing prices. The first tranche will be sold at $o.6, the second at $0.72, the third at $0.864, and the fourth at $1. Of the total volume of 300 million SunCoins created, 97 million will be issued through the ICO, with the rest being held by Solar Bankers and ShellPay as a liquidity guarantee to investors in the production of the PV devices. The ICO will be run in cooperation with Lykke, a cryptocurrency exchange based in Switzerland, which will also subsequently act as the main market-maker in the public trading of SunCoin from early 2018 onwards.

Solar Bankers claims that SunCoin offers a unique set of entrepreneurial opportunities for buyers to make use of independently, which provide the token with a high degree of intrinsic value by comparison to other cryptocurrencies. In addition to being tradable at Lykke and various other exchanges, SunCoin allows owners to buy Solar Bankers’ devices at a discounted price and will act as the main exchange medium in the localized energy communities of the SunChain. The value of the coin can thus be seen as representing a right of participation in local energy marketplaces, which sets it apart from other current crypto-financing projects.

How to achieve large profits in the current troublesome solar energy market? Solar Bankers has the solution!


By Carlo Maragliano, Ph.D., Head of R&D.

Given worldwide solar cell overproduction and consequent drops in solar energy prices, solar manufacturing companies are struggling to survive due to sensible profit reductions. In this scenario, a revision in solar module technology is required to achieve lower production costs and therefore securing continuity of the global solar market. Solar Bankers developed and patented a solar panel that achieves 50% cost savings compared to standard modules and produces up to 30% more power output, even at high operative temperatures. Such technology represents the ultimate solution to guarantee large profits for PV manufacturers in the present market.

According to technology experts and policy makers, solar energy is the future of the global energy market. Solar is a renewable source of energy that produces little to no pollution and can be used to power small machineries as well as entire cities. The cost of solar energy has decreased tremendously in the last years and today we read more and more of solar parks being installed all over the world. Although solar energy demand is increasing yearly at an unprecedented rate, the situation that the solar energy market is experiencing is anything but positive.

Since the beginning of 2016, the solar energy market has been in standoff due to an overly crowded pool of manufacturers. The worldwide production capacity of solar cells has increased exponentially in the last 2 to 3 years, with most of the new manufacturing facilities being installed in China and South East Asia, and production has by far overpassed solar cell demand. In effect, the sole production capacity in South East Asia, not including China, is roughly enough to meet the joint demand of the two biggest solar markets, USA and Europe. As a natural consequence of production overcapacity, the price of solar energy (in $/W) has been monotonically decreasing, reducing gross margins of manufacturing companies to low single-digits and thus undermining their economical stability. Although most of the small-to-medium size manufacturers have been able to survive so far, the recent cuts in governmental subsidies, particularly in China, will probably lead to their bankruptcy. The world has just entered the era of solar company die-off: companies that were able to effectively minimize their production costs, without heavily relying on subsidies, will survive. The rest will perish.

production-cost-price

Low production costs represent a key factor in guaranteeing the survival of solar manufacturers. While in the past the solar market has succeeded in drastically reducing production costs by optimizing and/or scaling up manufacturing processes, it seems that the current solar module technology has reached a bottleneck. Today manufacturing costs are indeed mainly constituted by the cost of raw materials, which are less susceptible to price variation, and this makes it difficult for solar manufacturers to further reduce their expenses. Thus, in order to guarantee the solar market a florid future, a revision in solar module technology is needed, something that the market has not undergone since its early days.

Solar Bankers has the solution for the next generation of photovoltaics. We have developed and patented an innovative solar module that guarantees high performance at the lowest production cost in the market, enabling high profits even at the current solar module prices. Solar Bankers module looks exactly like a standard panel, but it hides a secret: a revolutionary optical film that manages the light and allows achieving unprecedented performance. The film, installed on the bottom surface of the solar module front glass, acts like a lens and a prism combined together: light rays hitting the panel are concentrated along one axis and separated according to their spectral properties (i.e. colors) into two separate beams. The part of the spectrum suitable for PV conversion (wavelengths from 300 to 1200 nm) are concentrated on silicon solar cell stripes, while the remaining wavelengths, which only cause panel overheating, are bended away from the active converter. Solar Bankers module requires only a fraction of silicon compared to standard modules, enabling up to 50% production cost savings. In addition, it also generates up to 30% more power output as the film reduces heat losses that are the consequence of being exposed to high temperatures. Solar Bankers module, certified and tested by the Fraunhofer Institute, enables thus consistent cost savings compared to standard modules and guarantees large profits at the present solar energy price.

If you wish to know more about our technology and/or you want to produce Solar Bankers module, please visit our website at http://www.solarbankers.com or contact us at info@solarbankers.com.

 

Solar Bankers Investment Pitch


logo1

Equatorial and sub-equatorial regions have a great potential when it comes to solar energy generation. As such areas are characterized by very high annual solar irradiances, it was estimated that solar modules installed in these regions could potentially produce 50% more energy compared to what they would otherwise generate if placed in Europe or North America. This should be enough encouragement to move all solar power generation businesses to these regions. However good these numbers, solar power growth in the equatorial and sub-equatorial regions has not yet lived up to global expectations.

So, what is hindering the great potential of solar PV in these areas? One point is the heat. Sub-equatorial and equatorial regions are characterized by very high temperatures, which during the summer can even reach 50C. Why is that negative for solar PV? Solar panels loose a % of their efficiency as their operative temperature rises above 25C, which is the standard temperature at which they are tested to determine their “nominal” efficiency. Standard Si modules (which represent over 90% of the market) loose in average 0.6 % in power conversion efficiency for every C increase in their working temperature. To put this in an example, a solar module with a proven efficiency of 20% at 25C, has at a working temperature of 60C an efficiency of only 15.8%, meaning that it loses more than 20% of its original capability of producing electricity. It is also important to note that the outside temperature is not the only factor that determines the operative temperature of a solar module. Under standard operation, a solar module, other than producing electricity, generates a lot of heat. Imagine that in a 20%-efficient solar module, almost 60% of the incoming energy is turned into heat. As this heat is not converted into electricity, it raises the temperature of the solar panel, thus negatively affecting its capability to produce electrical power. It is not unusual then that solar panels in the equatorial regions reach, during the summertime, temperatures above 75C. Under this condition, solar modules can loose over 30% of their original power conversion efficiency.

The PV community has embarked on different paths to reduce heat-related losses and thus maximise the performances of solar panels in high-temperature regions. The first path consists in improving material quality with the scope of bringing down the temperature coefficient of a solar module. This has produced Si solar modules with temperature coefficients as low as 0.3-0.35 %/C, with the caveat of being more expensive due to higher manufacturing costs. The second path consists in using alternative materials with lower temperature coefficients. Thin-film materials (like CIGS and CdTe) exhibits temperature coefficients as low as 0.2 %/C, which are considerably lower than that of Si modules. Although thin-film modules have also a competitive price, their low efficiencies and reduced durability represent today strong limiting factors, which are ultimately discouraging their use.

We at Solar Bankers undertook a different path, focusing on the source of the problem, the light, rather than solar cell materials. The sunlight is made of different colors, also called wavelengths, which together compose the sunlight spectrum. Among these wavelengths there are visible and invisible, infrared (IR) colors. Silicon solar modules can convert the visible spectrum and only a small portion of the IR light. The remaining wavelengths pass undisturbed trough silicon, but are turned into heat at the electrodes, which cover the back surface of solar cells. As a result, not only these wavelengths are not converted into useful electricity, but they also reduce the performance of the module, as they increase its operative temperature. Solar Bankers developed and patented a high-tech solution to get rid of unwanted, efficiency-lowering wavelengths, thus achieving better performance than standard modules even in high-temperature environments. The product consists in a nanostructured optical film that efficiently selects the light colors suitable for photovoltaic conversion and bends away those that only produce heat. The film, produced in large scales and at a very low cost, can be installed on existing modules or can be in alternative integrated on stand-alone panels. Field tests have confirmed that Solar Bankers film can reduce the difference between the module operating temperature and that of the ambient by almost 35%, leading to the recovery of the previously lost power output of up to 30% depending on solar cell quality.

Why are heat and high-temperatures hindering solar photovoltaic potential in the MENA region?


By Carlo Maragliano, Ph.D., Head of R&D.

The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has become, in the last few years, the favorite target for solar renewable energy companies all over the world. The reason is straightforward: the region has the highest access to sunlight throughout the year when compared to any other region around the globe. To understand this point and its implications, let’s make a simple comparison between one of the sunniest cities in Europe, Madrid, and the capital of the United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi. If we look at the annual sunshine hours, which measure the amount of hours that the sun shines during one-year time, Madrid has approximately 2750 sun-hours, while Abu Dhabi has over 4100. Imagine now that you have a solar panel, and are asked where to install it to obtain the maximum power output. Where would you put it? In Abu Dhabi, off course! In the capital of the UAE, indeed, the same module could potentially produce up to 150% of the power that it would generate in Madrid. This should be enough encouragement to move all solar power generation businesses to the MENA region, right? However good these numbers, solar power growth in the MENA region has not yet lived up to global expectations.

Map_irradiance

So, what is hindering the great potential of solar PV in this region? One point is the heat. The MENA region is characterized by very high temperatures, which during the summer can even reach 50C. Why is that negative for solar PV? Solar panels loose a % of their efficiency as their operative temperature rises above 25C, which is the standard temperature at which they are tested to determine their “nominal” efficiency. Standard Si modules (which represent over 90% of the market) loose in average 0.6 % in power conversion efficiency for every C increase in their working temperature. This figure is widely known by the PV community as the temperature coefficient of the solar module. To put this in an example, a solar module with a proven efficiency of 20% at 25C, has at a working temperature of 60C an efficiency of only 15.8%, meaning that it loses more than 20% of its original capability of producing electricity. It is also important to note that the outside temperature is not the only factor that determines the operative temperature of a solar module. Under standard operation, a solar module, other than producing electricity, generates a lot of heat. Imagine that in a 20%-efficient solar module, almost 60% of the incoming energy is turned into heat. As this heat is not converted into electricity, it raises the temperature of the solar panel, thus negatively affecting its capability to produce electrical power. It is not unusual then that solar panels in the MENA region reach, during the summertime, temperatures above 75C. Under this condition, solar modules can loose over 30% of their original power conversion efficiency.

Can we work around this problem? The PV community has embarked on different paths to reduce heat-related losses. The first path consists in improving material quality with the scope of bringing down the temperature coefficient of a solar module. This has produced Si solar modules with temperature coefficients as low as 0.3-0.35 %/C, with the caveat of being more expensive due to higher manufacturing costs. The second path consists in using alternative materials with lower temperature coefficients. Thin-film materials (like CIGS and CdTe) exhibits temperature coefficients as low as 0.2 %/C, which are considerably lower than that of Si modules. Although thin-film modules have also a competitive price, their low efficiencies and reduced durability represent today strong limiting factors, which are ultimately discouraging their use.

Are we then, out of options? No! We at Solar Bankers undertook a different path, focusing on the source of the problem, the light, rather than solar cell materials. The sunlight is made of different colors, also called wavelengths, which together compose the sunlight spectrum. Among these wavelengths there are visible and invisible, infrared (IR) colors. Silicon solar modules can convert the visible spectrum and only a small portion of the IR light. The remaining wavelengths pass undisturbed trough silicon, but are turned into heat at the electrodes, which cover the back surface of solar cells. As a result, not only these wavelengths are not converted into useful electricity, but they also reduce the performance of the module, as they increase its operative temperature. Solar Bankers developed and patented a high-tech solution to get rid of unwanted, efficiency-lowering wavelengths, thus achieving better performance than standard modules even in high-temperature environments. The product consists in a nanostructured optical film that efficiently selects the light colors suitable for photovoltaic conversion and bends away those that only produce heat. Field test have confirmed that Solar Bankers film can reduce the difference between the module operating temperature and that of the ambient by almost 35%, leading to the recovery of the previously lost power output of up to 30% depending on solar cell quality.

Now you might be thinking, “Great news, but I have already installed many MW and I am still paying for them!” Our patented technology can be added to existing solar panels, making it easier for you to upgrade your solar farm. Read more about how our technology can help you in www.solarbankers.com/technology.html or contact us! Stay tuned for more tips on how to increase the performance of your solar panels! And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter!

Nano Technology Outperforming Panel


“Low cost solar energy for all”, Mr. Ban Ki-Moon, Secretary General of the UN

Solar Bankers’ new generation of solar modules employ a nano-structured polymer foil on their cover glass which refracts and concentrates specific wavelengths of light to improve module performance. The polymer device’s refractive abilities allow it to separate absorbable, or “desirable”, wavelengths of solar radiation from efficiency-lowering wavelengths, such as infrared and other short-wave light. The foil then also acts as a lens and concentrates the separated spectra of light onto different areas on the module.

150830_Solarmodul_+Tracker

Long wavelengths of light, like infrared, are usually dispersed on the solar cell in the form of heat energy, which significantly reduces cell efficiency. Our nano-structured foil’s “light-splitting” effect allows efficiency-lowering radiation to be concentrated away from the actual cell, so that cell efficiency remains unaffected by incoming heat energy.

In parallel, the foil is able to concentrate “desirable” wavelengths directly onto the cell. This concentration – regardless of the efficiency of the cell used – increases the amount of absorbable solar radiation received by the cell per unit area by up to 40%.

Hence our foil significantly improves cell/module performance with the double-effect of A) protecting cells from efficiency-lowering light while B) increasing the amount of convertible solar energy arriving at the cell per unit area.

Our second-generation module can even use the heat energy refracted away from the cell to also produce electricity, further improving module efficiency.

150830_Solarmodul

This means modules using the foil can reduce the size of the cell – and the amount of silicon! – they employ by up to 90% while producing the same output as before. Given silicon is a module’s most expensive component, the described effect can reduce module unit production costs to an unprecedented degree.